Anne Dewar joins Henderson Equine Clinic

Hi Everyone, Dr. Anne Dewar here, I'm really excited to have joined the Henderson Equine Clinic team! 
Also exciting is that we are now treating sheep, goats, alpacas, and llamas as well as our equine patients! Feel free to give us a call to schedule your prelambing/kidding/criating vaccines, pregnancy diagnosis, meningeal worm shots, fecal egg counts or just to develop a animal health/management plan for your specific farm!

-Be sure to read more about Anne on our About US page.

Rabid cat found in Livingston County

November 23, 2012 by Mark Gillespie from the Livingston County News.

http://thelcn.com/2012/11/23/rabid-cat-found-in-livingston-county/

The New York State Department of Health reports that a feral cat found in the Town of York has tested positive for rabies.

The animal appeared to be in ill health and was rescued by an individual who took it to a veterinarian for treatment, according to Livingston County Public Health Director Joan Ellison.

The cat died at the vet’s office and its body sent in for laboratory testing Nov. 14. In light of the recent positive rabies result, three people are undergoing treatment to prevent the onset of the virus.

Feral cats create a potential for exposure to rabies that does not exist in other animals that are known to possibly have rabies. Feral cats can look and act just like a pet cat but they are wild animals and are unpredictable. They can bite at any time. The following tips from the Livingston County Health Department will help prevent rabies and potential rabies exposure:

 

  • A cat with rabies may not exhibit the typical symptoms of rabies. It may be aggressive, but it may also be acting very passive. Just because a cat looks harmless and is cute does not mean it is not rabid.
  • Livingston County is very rural, with populations of bats and raccoons that have rabies. Most cats, even domesticated ones, are hunters by nature and can come into contact with a bat or raccoon, and no one will ever know. All pet cats are required to be vaccinated against rabies.
  • Teach children to stay away from unfamiliar animals, either wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly.
  • Wash any wound from an animal thoroughly with soap and water, and seek medical attention immediately. Additionally, the LCDOH must then be notified of any exposure incident.
  • Be a responsible pet owner by keeping your pet’s vaccinations current. Getting your pets vaccinated can help stop the spread of rabies from wild animals to humans.

 

If you have any questions or would like further information on rabies, or rabies vaccination requirements, please contact the Livingston County Department of Health at 243-7280 or 335-1717.

West Nile Virus detected in a Genesee Co., NY Horse.

West Nile Virus detected in a Genesee Co., NY Horse.

 

West Nile Virus (WNV) was confirmed on serologic samples from a twenty eight year old gelding this week. The horse had no recent travel history. The gelding hadn’t been vaccinated for EEE, WNV or Rabies in at least a year or more according to veterinary records. On 10-9-12, the gelding was staggering around the farm according to the owner. On 10-11-12, the owner called the veterinarian to come examine the horse because it had gone down that morning. When the veterinarian arrived, the horse was standing again but exhibited marked muscle fasciculations in the head and was chomping at the air. The veterinarian initiated medical treatment and took blood samples. Later in the day, the horse deteriorated to the point of seizures. Due to the rapid decline in overall condition, the owner and veterinarian agreed to humanely euthanize the gelding that afternoon. Blood samples were sent to the NYS Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory last week where West Nile Virus was confirmed. There are two other aged horses on the premises. They are both doing well and have since been vaccinated.

Until there is a good killing frost in your area, we are still recommending vaccination for horses that have not had a booster in the last several months. Young, old or pregnant animals may be at increased risk.

The NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets has a new twitter account for your clients to follow on the latest news and updates from the department. Follow us at: @NYAgandMarkets. Our e-Alerts to accredited veterinarians will continue to be sent out regularly.

Case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis in Westchester

First Case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis in Westchester

Eastern Equine EncephalitisHorse likely infected outside of New York State

BEDFORD, NY -- August 31, 2012 -- Westchester County has learned of its first case ever of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) today, in a privately owned horse in Bedford, New York,  that had recently traveled out of state to an area where EEE is more common.

The horse developed neurological symptoms and was put down. It was subsequently tested and results confirmed today that the horse had Eastern Equine Encephalitis, a mosquito-borne disease. Given the recent travel history of the horse, the horse most likely was infected with EEE outside of Westchester, according to the New York State Department of Health. The Westchester County Department of Health conducted a local environmental assessment in the area around the private stable where the horse boarded but found no signs of mosquito breeding activity.

“This is a serious disease in horses, but the risk to people is quite low,’’ said Dr. Douglas Aspros, president of the Westchester County Board of Health and a veterinarian. “The viruses that cause this disease and other related diseases are responsible for only sporadic illness, and only occasionally are cases reported in horses and birds in southern New York State. This infection is unusual in animals and it is even rarer for it to cause illness in people.’’

According to state health department records kept since 1959, there has never been a human case of Eastern Equine Encephalitis in the New York metropolitan area, which includes Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Sullivan, Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Nassau and Suffolk counties. There were just two human cases of EEE in New York from 1964 to 2004, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta

“To protect against all mosquito-borne diseases, residents should continue to remove standing water on their property, use insect repellents with DEET according to the label instructions and take other appropriate precautions to reduce their risk of mosquito bites.’’ Rick Morrissey, deputy commissioner for environmental health.

As in prior years, the Health Department prepared for the summer mosquito season by applying larvicide briquettes to street catch basins that held standing water on county and local roads in an effort to prevent the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as the West Nile virus. Residents should continue to do their part by taking personal protection measures and removing standing water where mosquitoes can breed. 

For more information on the department’s larviciding and mosquito prevention activities, call the Westchester County Department of Health at (914) 813-5000 or visit www.westchestergov.com/health.

Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign

Merck Animal Health and the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) have developed the Unwanted Horse Veterinary Relief Campaign (UHVRC), a non-profit program that will provide equine vaccines to qualified equine rescue and retirement facilities across the United States.

 

 

Through the UHVRC, Merck Animal Health will donate equine vaccines to qualifying equine rescue and retirement facilities to provide healthcare so they can rehabilitate, revitalize and, ultimately, re-home America’s unwanted horses.

 

Equine rescue and retirement facilities will be selected to receive complimentary equine vaccines based on the completed application, compliance with the AAEP Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities, 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status, their need, the potential impact on horses’ lives and the professional manner in which the facility is managed.

 

How to get involved

AAEP-member veterinarians can work with equine rescue and retirement facilities to receive complimentary Merck Animal Health equine vaccines. The AAEP-member veterinarian and equine rescue and retirement facility work together to submit an application, the facilities checklist and the equine vaccine order form. Only facilities that follow the AAEP Care Guidelines for Equine Rescue and Retirement Facilities and have a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status will qualify for the program. Equine rescue and retirement facilities or veterinarians can download an application form, the AAEP Care Guidelines, and learn more atwww.UHVRC.org.

 

 Three of Merck Animal Health's equine vaccines are available through the UHVRC program: West Nile Virus vaccine; EquiRab™ rabies vaccine; and Prestige® V (KY93, KY02 and NM2/93 Flu Strains, EHV-1, EHV-4, EEE, WEE and Tetanus).

 

 

 

A portion of all Merck Animal Health equine vaccine sales will support the program. There are two application periods per year. The spring deadline is February 1 and the fall deadline is August 1. Applicants may only apply once a year.

Please give the office a call if you are interested in this program.

EEE Vaccination Rebate Program for NY Horses

Henderson Equine Clinic is participating in this program. Two important notes are that it only includes horses vaccinated after 6/10/2012. And it is First come first served.
STATE OF NEW YORK
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND MARKETS
10B Airline Drive
Albany, New York 12235
518-457-3502 fax 518-485-7773
EEE Vaccination Rebate Program for NY Horses
In response to mounting concerns regarding the increased number of cases of Eastern Equine 
Encephalitis (EEE), both in humans and in horses in New York over the last few years, the New York State
Senate has recently allocated funds for various activities meant to reduce the threat of EEE in people 
and in horses.
The NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, Division of Animal Industry has been assigned the task 
of running a vaccination program by offering $15.00 discounts to horse owners who get their horses 
vaccinated against EEE. The program is open to all horses residing in New York State.  Veterinarians who 
participate in the rebate program agree to discount their vaccination fees by $15.00 per horse. The state 
will then reimburse the veterinarian $15.00 per vaccinated horse. The vaccination must be given by the 
veterinarian or veterinary technician in order to qualify. 
The program will run from June 10, 2012 until August 31, 2012. This is a “first-come, first-served” 
program or until our funds are expended. If funds are left over after 8-31-12, we will restore the rebate 
program in early 2013. 
Any veterinarian legally able to practice in New York State can participate. Veterinarians need to fill out 
a form requesting the desired number of rebate certificates. (Only one horse per rebate certificate). The 
Rebate Request Form can be found online @ http://www.agriculture.ny.gov/AI/vet.html (look under the 
section called “Forms”) or we can fax, email or mail it to you.  Complete the request form and fax it back 
to us. Once we receive your request, we mail you the certificates along with the tax ID forms (W-9) that 
you must complete and send back with the original certificates once the horse(s) have been vaccinated. 
Complete instructions for the rebate certificates can be found on the backside of the certificates. All 
original forms must be sent back in order to receive your rebate.  No additional incurred veterinary fees 
will be paid for (i.e. – call charge, biohazard fees, etc). Once all forms are received, we will verify this and 
send you a rebate check.
If you have any questions, please email or call the Division of Animal Industry at dai@agriculture.ny.gov
or 518-457-3502.

EEE Vaccination Rebate Program for NY HorsesIn response to mounting concerns regarding the increased number of cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), both in humans and in horses in New York over the last few years, the New York StateSenate has recently allocated funds for various activities meant to reduce the threat of EEE in people and in horses.The NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets, Division of Animal Industry has been assigned the task of running a vaccination program by offering $15.00 discounts to horse owners who get their horses vaccinated against EEE. The program is open to all horses residing in New York State.  Veterinarians who participate in the rebate program agree to discount their vaccination fees by $15.00 per horse. The state will then reimburse the veterinarian $15.00 per vaccinated horse. The vaccination must be given by the veterinarian or veterinary technician in order to qualify. The program will run from June 10, 2012 until August 31, 2012. This is a “first-come, first-served” program or until our funds are expended. If funds are left over after 8-31-12, we will restore the rebate program in early 2013. Any veterinarian legally able to practice in New York State can participate. Veterinarians need to fill out a form requesting the desired number of rebate certificates. (Only one horse per rebate certificate). The Rebate Request Form can be found online @ http://www.agriculture.ny.gov/AI/vet.html (look under the section called “Forms”) or we can fax, email or mail it to you.  Complete the request form and fax it back to us. Once we receive your request, we mail you the certificates along with the tax ID forms (W-9) that you must complete and send back with the original certificates once the horse(s) have been vaccinated. Complete instructions for the rebate certificates can be found on the backside of the certificates. All original forms must be sent back in order to receive your rebate.  No additional incurred veterinary fees will be paid for (i.e. – call charge, biohazard fees, etc). Once all forms are received, we will verify this and send you a rebate check.If you have any questions, please email or call the Division of Animal Industry at dai@agriculture.ny.govor 518-457-3502.